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Blog posts of '2017' 'September'

Self Filming Tips with Tim Wells

 

By Tracy Breen

 

Self-filming a hunt isn’t very difficult. What is difficult is getting good footage that can be turned into a high-quality film. One hardcore hunter who spends a lot of time self-filming is Tim Wells from Relentless Pursuit TV. Wells films many of his own TV episodes so he knows about taking raw footage he filmed himself and turning it into a good looking TV episode. “For starters, I think every hunter who plans to film his own hunt needs a 4K camera.  With a 4K camera, a hunter can zoom in and show the animals they are filming when they are editing the film.  One of the biggest problems when people are self-filming is the animals are often way out in the middle of the woods or a field and you can’t see them very well when watching the footage.  With a 4K camera, this problem is solved because you can zoom in during the editing process so the viewers can see the action up close and personal.  There are several good 4K cameras on the market that don’t cost much money.  Everyone should have one,” Wells advised.

Wells also believes self-filming hunters should also have a 4K GoPro camera.  “With this camera, I can zoom in and make my point of view footage look better.  I like to have two cameras going and I want both of them to be 4K cameras,” Wells added.  

Marc Baird from Watermarc Productions believes having a second camera so the hunter can get a couple different angles is a must. “Having two cameras going tells more of the story,” Baird said. “It allows hunters to see what the animal is doing and allows people to see what the hunter is doing. If a person can’t afford a second camera, I suggest they go back after the shot and film some B-roll and add that in so the entire film isn’t just showing the woods and animals walking around.”

Another important thing when self-filming is making sure you use a camera arm that is easy to use when hunting and filming on your own. The Fourth Arrow Camera Arm system is easy to use and sets up quickly and quietly. The base and shoulder system is unique and easy to use.

Those who are filming their hunts with GoPro cameras or other point of view cameras will love the Fourth Arrow Outreach arm or ground stakes that are designed for filming with point of view cameras.

Self-filming a hunt can be challenging and rewarding. Hopefully the above tips will help you produce a better hunting film this fall.

Reasons you should Bowhunt at Eye Level

By Tracy Breen

 

The majority of whitetail bowhunters hunt from a treestand. However, in the last few years, more companies have introduced ground blinds that are perfect for bowhunters.  Below are three reasons every bowhunter should consider hunting whitetails from the ground this fall.


* Modern day ground blinds don’t spook deer.  The Redneck Bale Blind, the Shack Attack form Double Bull and many others blend in perfectly with their surroundings.  I have placed ground blinds out and have deer walking by them the same day.  If you don’t like climbing into tree-stands, don’t like the extreme cold or are taking a youngster hunting, ground blinds are a great option.


* I enjoy hunting from a ground blind because ground blinds allow me to hunt in areas I would otherwise have to ignore.  In many areas of the country, finding a good tree to hang a tree-stand in can be difficult.  Sometimes I am hunting close to a bedding area and I want to slip in and out quietly.  Hunting from a ground blind is the easiest way to do that.  There are times where I need to hunt in the middle of a field where a buck is routinely seen traveling from one area to another.  A ground blind is a great option for this type of hunt.


* Filming a hunt out of a ground blind is much more enjoyable than filming from a treestand.  Filming at buck at 20 yards on the ground is exciting and can provide awesome footage.  When you film from a ground blind, you can easily move around and move your camera and tripod around without getting busted.  Filming from a tree is often complicated.  When filming from a ground blind, getting all your gear set up quickly is simple.


If you plan to hunt from a ground blind this fall, check out the Fourth Arrow Camera Arm Rex Arm.  This simple tripod arm allows you to rotate your camera 360 degrees while on a tripod.  This makes filming from a blind much easier because you don’t have to pick up your tripod while the camera is attached and move it to get the best filming angle.   Simply rotate the Rex Arm and you can get great footage without moving or making noise.


Hunting deer from a ground blind can be extremely fun and rewarding.  Try it this fall!

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